Abstract/Details

Adhesion associated with solids and liquids


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

This work was done to study the relation between the lateral adhesive force, f, and time t. The experiments were performed on different substrates using different liquids. Both soft and rigid surfaces were checked to find whether there is an effect of waiting time on lateral adhesive force. Experiments were performed on both coated as well as uncoated surfaces. The lateral adhesive force was measured using the tilting plate method. The drop motion was recorded using a PG Goniometer. The force, f, required to slide a drop past a surface is shown to be a function of the time, t, the drop waited on the surface prior to the commencement of sliding along it. The “rest time” effect was observed in different systems, which suggests that this phenomenon is general. It is shown that df/dt is never negative. As the resting time increases, df/dt decreases towards zero (plateau) as time approaches infinity. The reason for the change in retention force with time is a deformation of the surface that results from the Laplace pressure induced by the drop on the surface as expressed by the unsatisfied normal component of the Young's equation. From the experimental results it was observed that this phenomenon was more pronounced for softer materials than for hard materials.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Chemical engineering;
Materials science
Classification
0542: Chemical engineering
0794: Materials science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences
Title
Adhesion associated with solids and liquids
Author
Chaurasia, Kumud
Number of pages
49
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0424
Source
MAI 48/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109502084
University/institution
Lamar University - Beaumont
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.E.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1472531
ProQuest document ID
304763505
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304763505
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