Abstract/Details

Large mammal utilization and subsistence stress in Late Prehistoric South Texas


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

This thesis presents the results of my analysis of the animal remains from site 41SP220, a Late Prehistoric Toyah campsite in South Texas. Bioarchaeological and ethnohistoric evidence suggests that Toyah groups, like many other hunter-gatherers, were subject to periodic instances of subsistence-related stress. One of the most common cross-cultural responses to subsistence stress is the broadening of dietary patterns to include a greater number of marginal resources. In this study, my primary research question is whether the inhabitants of site 41SP220 were exploiting certain marginal bone fat resources (i.e., bone grease deposits) that are usually an indication of stressful conditions.

Two aspects of large mammal utilization, carcass transport and bone processing, are examined to determine the extent to which decisions by the site's inhabitants were directed toward the procurement of bone grease. The results show that while both bison and deer bones from the site were processed for marrow extraction, they were not crushed for the production of bone grease. These results suggest that the inhabitants of site 41SP220 either did not experience a level of stress severe enough to warrant marginal bone fat exploitation or that alternative stress-coping mechanisms were employed at the site.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Archaeology
Classification
0324: Archaeology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Archaeology; Texas; Toyah; Zooarchaeology
Title
Large mammal utilization and subsistence stress in Late Prehistoric South Texas
Author
Gilmore, Zachary
Number of pages
118
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0209
Source
MAI 46/02M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549222200
Advisor
Lapham, Heather A.
Committee member
Drolet, Robert P.; Hill, Jonathan D.; Welch, Paul D.
University/institution
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
Department
Anthropology
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1446971
ProQuest document ID
304814868
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304814868
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