Abstract/Details

How does the complexity and number of enrichment stations influence the occurrence and frequency of atypical behaviors in a colony of captive squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus and S. boliviensis)?


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Nine captive squirrel monkeys (S. sciureus and S. boliviensis) at a local zoo exhibited some atypical behaviors such as pacing, head twirling, overgrooming of tails, and scratching. Behavioral observations using scan sampling methods were used to measure effectiveness of different types of enrichment devices based on complexity and number in reducing these atypical behaviors. Data was analyzed using factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc fisher LSD tests. The results revealed a pattern in which scratching, overgrooming, watching, and stereotypical behaviors increased prior to the introduction of enrichment. When enrichment was present these behaviors significantly reduced except for aggression which increased. Post enrichment these behaviors including aggression occurred at high levels. Provision of enrichment is more beneficial to the animals than not introducing enrichment at all. Reducing atypical behaviors requires proper implementation and design of the enrichment devices that incorporate adequate complexity such that species specific behaviors are maintained even after extended contact.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Ecology;
Anatomy & physiology;
Animals;
Zoology;
Environmental science
Classification
0329: Ecology
0433: Anatomy & physiology
0433: Animals
0472: Zoology
0768: Environmental science
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Biological sciences
Title
How does the complexity and number of enrichment stations influence the occurrence and frequency of atypical behaviors in a colony of captive squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus and S. boliviensis)?
Author
Alexander, Sarah N.
Number of pages
79
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0213
Source
MAI 45/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Shields, William
University/institution
State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1440523
ProQuest document ID
304816173
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304816173
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