Abstract/Details

Professional learning communities: A case study of Title I middle school educators' perceptions and student achievement


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

This mixed method dissertation was designed to investigate professional learning communities at one Title I middle school. Educators' perceptions and student achievement were examined. Results from a Likert scaled survey and face-to-face interviews were analyzed looking for the presence of a professional learning community culture. Results from the 2008 Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) were examined for the basis of measuring student achievement. This study was framed around Hipp and Huffman's (2002), Hord's (1997, 2004), and Huffman and Hipp's (2003) 6 characteristics of a professional learning community: (a) shared and supportive leadership; (b) shared values and vision; (c) collective learning and application; (d) shared personal practice; (e) supportive conditions--relationships; and (f) supportive conditions--structures. An analysis of the collected data revealed a strong (88%) perception of evidence that this school had a positive professional learning community culture, and reflected positive student achievement.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Teacher education;
Secondary education;
Learning;
Case studies;
Middle schools;
Perceptions;
Academic achievement
Classification
0530: Teacher education
0533: Secondary education
Identifier / keyword
Education; Achievement; Educators' perceptions; Middle school; Professional learning communities; Student achievement; Title I
Title
Professional learning communities: A case study of Title I middle school educators' perceptions and student achievement
Author
Stanfield, Anna Maria
Number of pages
164
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
1443
Source
DAI-A 69/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549868576
University/institution
Northcentral University
University location
United States -- Arizona
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3334049
ProQuest document ID
304817896
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304817896
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