Abstract/Details

The uninsured and increasing pressures for hospitals to provide charity care


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

There are 45 million Americans without health insurance, with the poor and near poor being at greater risk for not having access to health care. As the numbers of uninsured and underinsured continue to rise, hospitals have been expected to provide free care to those without health insurance. This paper takes a look at the effect that the uninsured has on our society and the impact of competition in the health care industry. It also looks at why there is an expectation for hospitals to be charitable institutions, their response to the growing pressures, and their struggles to meet the economic demands to be fiscally responsible in the midst of providing free care to the uninsured. This study focuses on hospitals in New York State, in particularly, Nassau County, NY. The paper will look at the benefits that hospitals provide to the community, which are sometimes overlooked and will attempt to provide some solutions at addressing the problems of uninsured and underinsured charity care by hospitals.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social work;
Welfare;
Health care;
Uninsured people;
Charities
Classification
0452: Social work
0630: Welfare
0769: Health care
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Social sciences
Title
The uninsured and increasing pressures for hospitals to provide charity care
Author
Villagran, Stacy
Number of pages
62
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
1408
Source
MAI 46/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549500308
Advisor
Weiss, Jeffrey
University/institution
State University of New York Empire State College
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1452456
ProQuest document ID
304820349
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304820349
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