Abstract/Details

Content addressable data management


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

A direct implication of both the industry and academia proclaiming the Age of Tera-(even the Peta)-scale computing, is that applications have become more data intensive than ever. The increased data volume from applications tackling larger and larger problems has fueled the need for efficient management of this data. In this thesis, we evaluate a technique called Content Addressable Storage or CAS, for managing large volumes of data. This evaluation focuses on the benefits and demerits of using CAS for, (i) improved application performance via lockless and lightweight synchronization of accesses to shared storage data; (ii) improved cache performance; (iii) increase in storage capacity; and, (iv) increased network bandwidth. We present the design of a CAS-based file store that significantly improves the storage performance providing lightweight and lock-less user-defined consistency semantics. As a result, our file-system shows a 28% increase in read-bandwidth and a 13% increase in write bandwidth, over a popular file-system in common use. We use the same experimental file-system to analyze CAS on data from real world application benchmarks. We also estimate the potential benefits of using CAS for a virtual machine based user mobility application, that was in active use at a public deployment for over a period of seven months.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Computer science
Classification
0984: Computer science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Content-addressable storage; Data management
Title
Content addressable data management
Author
Nath, Partho
Number of pages
162
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0176
Source
DAI-B 68/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549046882
University/institution
The Pennsylvania State University
University location
United States -- Pennsylvania
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3266169
ProQuest document ID
304821227
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304821227
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