Abstract/Details

The synthesis and luminescence properties of lanthanide-based nanoparticles for biological application


2008 2008

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Lanthanide-doped nanoparticles have great potential as a new kind of luminescent material. In this thesis, we report the synthesis of Cerium-doped LaF3 nanoparticles in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using chemical reaction at different temperatures. We found that the emission of nanoparticles in DMSO not only depends on reaction temperature but also reaction time. The emission of DMSO solution can be tuned by reaction time, from 490 nm to 650 nm. The formation of LaF3:Ce3+ nanoparticles has been identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The TEM results show that the average sizes of these nanoparticles are within 10 nm to 13 nm, which is consistent with the sizes we obtained from XRD measurement. The mechanisms for tunable emissions are being investigated. In most biological application, especially in vivo application, nanoparticles are required to be water soluble and biocompatible. Based on this concept, we have developed a simple chemical method for making high-quality, well-defined, water-soluble lanthanide-ions-doped LaF3 nanoparticles. All the nanoparticles we synthesized are water soluble and emit very strong luminescence.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Condensation;
Biophysics;
Materials science
Classification
0611: Condensation
0786: Biophysics
0794: Materials science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Pure sciences; Biological sciences
Title
The synthesis and luminescence properties of lanthanide-based nanoparticles for biological application
Author
Yao, Mingzhen
Number of pages
49
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
2502
Source
MAI 47/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549715993
Advisor
Chen, Wei
Committee member
Liu, Ping; Yang, Jian
University/institution
The University of Texas at Arlington
Department
Physics
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1456720
ProQuest document ID
304825206
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304825206
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.