Abstract/Details

The public's view of terrorism in their communities as related to media-viewing habits


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the beliefs and behaviors of criminology and communications students in regards to general media and terrorism media exposure, as well as fear of terrorism. It was conducted using a survey, which concentrated on the participants' media-viewing habits; perceptions of current terrorism trends; fear of terrorism; viewer characteristics; and demographic information.

Results revealed more frequent media exposure among communications students than among criminology students. Criminology students were more likely to believe another terrorist attack is likely in the United States, while being less fearful of such an attack on a personal level; communication students were more likely to be fearful on a personal level, but were less inclined to believe that the United States will suffer another terrorist attack. Further differences between the groups regarding viewer characteristics and fear of terrorism were also found.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Criminology;
Mass communications
Classification
0627: Criminology
0708: Mass communications
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences
Title
The public's view of terrorism in their communities as related to media-viewing habits
Author
Bradshaw, Renee
Number of pages
97
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
2502
Source
MAI 47/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549707493
Advisor
Carmen, Alejandro del
Committee member
Dobbs, Rhonda; Sarver, Robert, III
University/institution
The University of Texas at Arlington
Department
Criminology & Criminal Justice
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1456548
ProQuest document ID
304826264
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304826264
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