Abstract/Details

Spatial interaction models of freshman recruitment and retention at Stephen F. Austin State University for the years 2001–2005


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

Student enrollment and retention are high priorities for universities these days, and Stephen F. Austin State University (SFA) is no exception. Schools are increasingly using geographic analysis methods to improve enrollment and retention. One particular method being used to track and predict enrollment is the gravity model (a.k.a. spatial interaction model). This study has the first known gravity models of retention rates or Texas enrollment. This study presents two gravity models, one each for freshman enrollment and freshman retention rates at SFA during 2001-2005. The models use as predictors public school graduates, competition from other colleges and universities, and distance from SFA. The models were linearized using logarithms and calibrated using ordinary least squares regression. The enrollment model was highly significant, and the residuals were analyzed. The retention model was not significant. In its place, a scatterplot of freshman enrollment vs. retention rates was analyzed at three different enrollment levels.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Geography;
Statistics;
School administration;
Higher education
Classification
0366: Geography
0463: Statistics
0514: School administration
0745: Higher education
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Education; Pure sciences
Title
Spatial interaction models of freshman recruitment and retention at Stephen F. Austin State University for the years 2001–2005
Author
Arreguin, Marcus A.
Number of pages
154
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
6340
Source
MAI 47/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109057775
Advisor
Forbes, Bill
University/institution
Stephen F. Austin State University
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.I.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1463288
ProQuest document ID
304827134
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304827134
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