Abstract/Details

A collective case study of pupil truancy and the effects upon student behavior within academic and social contexts


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Students who are truant from school may result in their becoming academically and socially unprepared to enter the work force. In an age in which higher paying jobs require technical skills from workers, employees with minimal skills and academic preparation have a negative social and fiscal impact upon the school community and the larger social order of the country.

The purpose of this study examines the problem through personal, in-depth interviews of students identified as truants in order to provide a deeper understanding of the phenomena and the critical effects upon their academic and social development. Eight individual students are interviewed, examining their lived experiences as it relates to their education through a collective case study methodology. The reconstruction of these students' reflections on life events provides a subjective analysis of their school attendance, with implications for educators to begin prevention and intervention strategies prior the onset of the middle school experience.

Indexing (details)


Subject
School administration;
Academic guidance counseling
Classification
0514: School administration
0519: Academic guidance counseling
Identifier / keyword
Education; Absenteeism; Academic context; Attendance; Disconnection; High school; Social context; Social contexts; Truancy
Title
A collective case study of pupil truancy and the effects upon student behavior within academic and social contexts
Author
Shironaka, Timothy
Number of pages
176
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0173
Source
DAI-A 69/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549486763
University/institution
University of the Pacific
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3302737
ProQuest document ID
304834430
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304834430
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