Abstract/Details

Women's ways of drinking: College women, high -risk alcohol use, and related consequences


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

The purpose of this study is to explore college women's high-risk alcohol use and related consequences to form a gender-related perspective of their drinking and related consequences. Because previous studies are based on male norms and constructs, this study employs a qualitative approach to understand, and provide visibility for, college women's alcohol experiences and related outcomes. Ten undergraduate females from a co-educational university participated in interviews during the spring semester of 2006. The data was analyzed using methods associated with the Grounded Theory approach. The results of the data analysis offer four major themes, which include a conceptual model, the Relational Ritual Reinforcement (R3), for understanding the recurring high-risk alcohol use and related negative consequences among some university women. Implications for research, practice, and policy are discussed.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Womens studies;
Public health;
Higher education;
Alcohol use;
College students
Classification
0453: Womens studies
0573: Public health
0745: Higher education
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences, Social sciences, Education, Alcohol, College, College women, Drinking, High-risk use, Substance abuse, Women, Women students
Title
Women's ways of drinking: College women, high -risk alcohol use, and related consequences
Author
Smith, Margaret Ann
Number of pages
158
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 68/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549330875
Advisor
Berger, Joseph B.
Committee member
Thayer, Millicent S.; Williams, Elizabeth A.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Education
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3289272
ProQuest document ID
304838465
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304838465
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