Abstract/Details

Age differences in eye movements during video viewing


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

This study examined eye movements during video viewing across a wide age range and establishes eye-tracking as a useful tool for studying age differences in processing of video. One-year-olds, 4-year-olds, and adults watched 20 minutes of Sesame Street, a program produced for young children. Results suggest that while the underlying mechanisms controlling eye movements during video viewing are relatively stable across these age groups, particular patterns of eye movements differed in important ways. Specifically, infants' fixations were more variable and less responsive to content boundaries than were those of older children and adults. Results have implications for the extent to which very young children comprehend and can learn from video.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Developmental psychology;
Age differences;
Eye movements;
Video recordings
Classification
0620: Developmental psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology, Age differences, Eye movements, Video viewing
Title
Age differences in eye movements during video viewing
Author
Kirkorian, Heather L.
Number of pages
87
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 68/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549171751
Advisor
Anderson, Daniel R.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3275790
ProQuest document ID
304838962
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304838962
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