Abstract/Details

The role of practice in learning computer literacy skills


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

There is a framework of thought that identifies practice activities as an important component in the learning process. The intent of this study was to investigate the relation between the number of practice activities completed by the student and the student's exam score. The population (n=183) consisted of students enrolled in a computer literacy course at a small midwestern university. SAM, Skills Assessment Manager, was the software that was used to train and assess the students in this study. The student first completed a pretest. The student was then provided access to training activities and lastly completed an actual assessment covering the same performance tasks. The Hake Model was implemented to calculate a normalized gain score. The correlation between the number of practice activities completed by the participant and the participant's exam score was significant. The correlation between the number of practice activities completed and the participant's normalized gain score was also significant. An alpha level of 0.002 was used for all statistical analysis. The findings reveal that those students that completed all of the practice activities performed at a higher level on their actual assessment than did other students.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Educational software;
Curricula;
Teaching;
Higher education
Classification
0710: Educational software
0727: Curricula
0727: Teaching
0745: Higher education
Identifier / keyword
Education; Computer literacy; Learning; Practice
Title
The role of practice in learning computer literacy skills
Author
Clark, Judy A.
Number of pages
69
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0138
Source
DAI-A 68/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Brooks, David W.
University/institution
The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
University location
United States -- Nebraska
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3257656
ProQuest document ID
304839120
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304839120
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