Abstract/Details

Rethinking theories of transitions in the Former Soviet Union


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation seeks to provide an empirical evaluation of whether scholars are justified in calling for the end of the transition paradigm, the dominant model of democratization study among Comparative Politics scholars. My thesis argues that the predominant emphasis on elections and institutions among transition theorists is largely ineffective in understanding democratic transitions in the former Soviet Union. To test my thesis, I conduct qualitative case studies of Ukraine and Russia that focus on the role of elections and institutions in the transition process.

Under the transitions model, one would reasonably expect the transition process in each country to be relatively similar, given the similar timing and manner in which elections and institutions were implemented, coupled with strong geographic, cultural, and historic commonalities. Instead, both cases have experienced highly divergent paths of development with varied levels of success.

This comprehensive study sheds serious doubt on the ability of the transitions model to accurately comprehend the dynamics of democratic development in the former Soviet Union. Though many scholars have criticized certain assumptions or components of the transitions model, few if any, have constructed a comprehensive, empirical analysis of the transitions model on its own terms.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Political science;
International law;
International relations;
Russian history
Classification
0615: Political science
0616: International law
0616: International relations
0724: Russian history
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, Democracy, Eastern Europe, Putin, Vladimir, Regime change, Russia, Ukraine, Yeltsin, Boris, Yushchenko, Viktor
Title
Rethinking theories of transitions in the Former Soviet Union
Author
Perry, Luke
Number of pages
294
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 68/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549330424
Advisor
Sedgwick, Jeffrey
Committee member
Einhorn, Eric; Jones, Robert E.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Political Science
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3289233
ProQuest document ID
304839899
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304839899
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