Abstract/Details

Investigating associative connectivity of extralist cues for unrelated word lists


2008 2008

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Abstract (summary)

Activating information in long-term memory implicitly activates related information. Formal investigation of this phenomenon is often conducted through examining word association sets. Associative sets most often facilitate access to target information but can also, in some procedures, impair access. Associative set effects have been found more consistently in cued recall than in free recall. This study examines associative set effects in free recall as well as cued recall by using extralist cues and part-list cuing. This project clarifies the situations under which associative set effects are measured by using multiple recall methods and updated normative word list data. Results indicate a need for revision of current implicit memory models to account for the consistent reliance on implicit representations during all recall tasks.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cognitive psychology
Classification
0633: Cognitive psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology
Title
Investigating associative connectivity of extralist cues for unrelated word lists
Author
Rickard, Mackenzie Fitz
Number of pages
75
Publication year
2008
Degree date
2008
School code
6050
Source
MAI 47/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549908128
Advisor
Oswald, Karl
University/institution
California State University, Fresno
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1460394
ProQuest document ID
304841255
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304841255
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