Abstract/Details

The role of inositol 1,4,5 -trisphosphate receptor type-1 in regulation of intracellular calcium oscillations in mouse eggs


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Calcium ([Ca2+]i) oscillations, a hallmark of mammalian fertilization, are essential to induce egg activation and embryonic development. As the zygotes transition through the cell cycle, these [Ca 2+]i oscillations progressively diminish until they cease in interphase zygotes. While the mechanism(s) underlying the regulation of [Ca2+]i oscillations may be multi-layered, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) emerge as a focal point in this regulation. IP3Rs, the calcium channels expressed in all cell types and abundantly expressed in mammalian eggs, contain consensus sequences for phosphorylation by various kinases and interact with members of the cytoskeleton, serving as an integrator of regulatory signals. This dissertation highlights the impact of biochemical and cellular changes in IP3R-1 on fertilization-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations. Together with the changes in the cellular distribution of the sperm factor, these cell cycle-dependent modifications in IP3R-1 may underlie the regulation of [Ca 2+]i oscillations in fertilized mammalian eggs.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Cellular biology
Classification
0379: Cellular biology
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Calcium oscillations; Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate; Intracellular calcium
Title
The role of inositol 1,4,5 -trisphosphate receptor type-1 in regulation of intracellular calcium oscillations in mouse eggs
Author
Lee, Bora
Number of pages
152
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 68/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549383888
Advisor
Fissore, Rafael A.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Molecular & Cellular Biology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3293932
ProQuest document ID
304845170
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304845170
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