Abstract/Details

Synthesis and characterization of ortho-phenylene ethynylene oligomers: A new scaffold for foldamer research


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

As a new frontier of foldamer research based on the synthesis and characterization of oligomers programmed to fold and self assemble into secondary structures continues to open, new scaffolds with a variety of dimensions are required. Presented here is the synthesis and characterization of a new ortho -Phenylene Ethynylene (o-PE) backbone scaffold. This scaffold has been synthesized using Sonogashira methods with a variety of building blocks containing π-rich and π-poor elements substituted with non polar and polar substituents. Solvent induced folding of these short oligomers into well defined helices was confirmed via 1D and 2D NMR methods. Utilizing the electron rich and electron poor phenylene building blocks, variations of these o-PE oligomers have been synthesized to determine the folded stability of π-rich vs. π-poor vs. π-poor/rich systems. Variations in temperature offer a route, aside from solvent denaturation, to probe the stability of the folded structures. This is the first report of a highly detailed solution NMR characterization using 1-D and 2-D methods examining the folding of a PE backbone without hydrogen bonds, and the first for an oPE system in general.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Polymers
Classification
0495: Polymers
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences, Foldamer, Oligomers, Phenylene ethynylene
Title
Synthesis and characterization of ortho-phenylene ethynylene oligomers: A new scaffold for foldamer research
Author
Jones, Ticora V.
Number of pages
223
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 68/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Tew, Gregory N.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3254962
ProQuest document ID
304845214
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304845214
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