Abstract/Details

Self -assembly of nanoparticles by molecular recognition


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Self-assembly of nanoparticles present an excellent tool to bridge the gap between the synthetic "bottom up" and lithographic "top down" approaches. Nanoparticles provide versatile tools for materials applications as they feature unique electronic, magnetic and optical properties associated with their core material. The present study utilizes the 'bricks and mortar' method, where dendrimers and proteins were used as mortar' and nanoparticles as 'bricks'. Non-covalent assembly mechanisms were used in exploring nanocomposite structures such as morphology, spacing, and achieving materials with tunable properties. The nanoparticles were synthesized and assembled with a series of dendrimer generations and various proteins providing a systematic increase in interparticle spacing. The modulation of optical and magnetic properties based upon the type of spacer was studied. In addition, we sought to incorporate inherent protein function into the nanoparticle ensembles, thereby greatly expanding the scope for development of new functional materials. The collective optical or magnetic response of the nanocomposite with tunable properties paves the way for the creation of new novel functional materials.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Organic chemistry
Classification
0490: Organic chemistry
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences, Molecular recognition, Nanoparticles, Self-assembly
Title
Self -assembly of nanoparticles by molecular recognition
Author
Srivastava, Sudhanshu
Number of pages
156
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 68/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549330547
Advisor
Rotello, Vincent M.
Committee member
Dinsmore, Anthony; Emrick, Todd; Venkataraman, Dhandapani
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Chemistry
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3289245
ProQuest document ID
304845401
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304845401
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