Abstract/Details

American man: The ambitious searches of Richard Wright and Ernest Hemingway


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation is a comparative examination of how certain works by Ernest Hemingway and Richard Wright jointly address themes concerning manhood, violence, and alienation. The dissertation considers how each American writer's treatment of common themes is effected by race and the social climates they come out of: the American Midwest during and after the World War I era and the American South after The Great Depression. An important dimension of this study is how each man traveled to identical geographical settings-Spain, Africa, and France and responded to globally significant events taking place there such as The Spanish Civil War and independence coming to Anglo-Africa after World War II. The shared subject here is the affects of modernity on traditional culture. Their debut collection of short stories in the mid 20's to late 30's on through to their nonfiction journals on Anglo-Africa in the early 1950's shows a developing struggle, in each writer, with detached individualism and offering political analysis and commentary.

Indexing (details)


Subject
American studies;
American literature;
Gender
Classification
0323: American studies
0591: American literature
0733: Gender
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Language, literature and linguistics; Alienation; Hemingway, Ernest; Man; Manhood; Violence; Wright, Richard
Title
American man: The ambitious searches of Richard Wright and Ernest Hemingway
Author
Forbes, Michael Kwame
Number of pages
200
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 68/07, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549171638
Advisor
Thelwell, Michael
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Afro-American Studies
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3275780
ProQuest document ID
304846407
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304846407
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