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Citation/Abstract

The sticking point: Human rights and civil-military relations in Latin America


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)


This dissertation examines change in civil-military relations. Many countries of Latin America and indeed the world have struggled in recent years to hold their armed forces accountable for human rights violations they have committed in the past. In Latin America, there has been a gradual progression towards uncovering the truth about such crimes and ultimately prosecution of members of the military for them. After examining competing explanations for and discussing the pattern of that change in Argentina and Chile, Peru is offered as a recent addition to the list of countries attempting to assert this authority over the armed forces. While I find that the Peruvian case supports scholarship that argues that transnational activist networks should be credited with leading states to adopt and institutionalize the norm of human rights accountability over their armed forces, I also find that institutional, cultural and rationalist factors serve to limit the transformation of civil-military relations. Though transnational activist networks can often enjoy "moments" of powerful influence over policy-making, the return of the human rights accountability to the realm of "normal politics" and the weak institution of the judicial system present formidable obstacles to the consolidation of the rule of law.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Political science
Classification
0615: Political science
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, Human rights, Civil-military relations, Latin America, Argentina, Chile, Peru
Title
The sticking point: Human rights and civil-military relations in Latin America
Author
Root, Rebecca K.
Pages
367 p.
Number of pages
367
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 68/02, Aug 2007
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Wiarda, Howard J.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3254911
ProQuest document ID
304846634
Copyright
Copyright UMI - Dissertations Publishing 2007
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304846634