Abstract/Details

On the relay selection strategy in large peer -to -peer networks


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

In recent years, real-time applications such as voice and video are increasingly taking up a large share of Internet traffic. However, loss and delay occurred in the underlying network can affect the users' perception negatively. Recent research has shown that applications can avoid end-to-end performance degradation if they bypass problematic networks by dynamically choosing an alternative path to send traffic. Such a dynamic path switching strategy requires the support beyond traditional IP routing and effective utilization of Internet path diversity.

The work in this dissertation was motivated by the desire to improve end-to-end application performance. We present our work from two different perspectives. In the first part, we investigate “how” to exploit Internet path diversity to mitigate end-to-end performance degradation, by proposing several heuristics that construct overlay paths using large peer-to-peer networks. We focus our attention on cases where a large number of choices are available. In other words, we investigate how to exploit the underlying Internet path diversity in an effective and scalable way. Then in the second part, we attempt to understand Internet routing events by studying routing update messages observed from multiple vantage points using statistical methods. Our results show that our proposed scheme may effectively construct alternative paths that serve as the candidate of dynamic path switching while incurring reasonable overhead.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Electrical engineering
Classification
0544: Electrical engineering
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences; Path switching; Peer-to-peer; Relay selection
Title
On the relay selection strategy in large peer -to -peer networks
Author
Fei, Teng
Number of pages
92
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 68/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549330226
Advisor
Gao, Lixin
Committee member
Gong, Weibo; Kurose, James; Wolf, Tilman
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Electrical & Computer Engineering
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3289213
ProQuest document ID
304847147
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304847147
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