Abstract/Details

Investigating human medial temporal representations of episodic information: A multi-modal approach


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Through multi-modal investigation of medial temporal lobe (MTL) function using high-resolution structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electrophysiological recordings, and imaging genetics, this dissertation investigates various remaining questions on the role of the hippocampal subregions during episodic learning and memory. Learning and recalling information from personal experiences (episodic) is central for everyday living; damage to the MTL results in an inability to learn new episodic information. This dissertation presents data from four experiments investigating the role of medial temporal structures during the learning and recall of episodic information. Using high-resolution functional MRI, we show that blood-oxygenated-level-dependent (BOLD) activity increases within the CA3 and dentate gyrus regions during encoding of novel associated contextual information of an episode and increases within the subiculum during retrieval of this learned information. Hippocampal CA1 activity increases and correlates to performance during learning of allocentric (viewpoint-independent) spatial information. Single neurons within the CA3 and dentate gyms differentiate in firing rate to similar episodes stored in memory. Additionally, these regions show BOLD decreases during episodic learning in older individuals who are genetically at-risk for Alzheimer's Disease. Overall, this dissertation supports the idea that separate hippocampal subregions contribute differently during the learning and recall of episodic information.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Neurosciences
Classification
0317: Neurosciences
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences; Blood oxygenated level dependent; Episodic information; Hippocampus; Medial temporal lobe
Title
Investigating human medial temporal representations of episodic information: A multi-modal approach
Author
Suthana, Nanthia Ananda
Number of pages
113
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0031
Source
DAI-B 70/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109471014
Advisor
Bookheimer, Susan Y.
University/institution
University of California, Los Angeles
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3384067
ProQuest document ID
304854656
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304854656
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