Abstract/Details

The evaluation of new criteria for polytomous DIF in the DFIT framework


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Using a Monte Carlo research design, this study examined the efficacy of the item parameter replication (IPR) method (Oshima, Raju, & Nanda, 2006) for determining cutoff values for polytomous items within the differential functioning of items and tests (DFIT) framework (Raju, van der Linden, & Fleer, 1995). It was hypothesized IPR-based cutoffs would be more likely to detect differential item functioning (DIF) than previously recommended fixed cutoffs and would have false positive rates close to the nominal significance level. Results supported the efficacy of the IPR method. Further, the accuracy of DIF detection was compared between the IPR method and likelihood ratio (LR) test (Thissen, Steinberg, & Wainer, 1988). Across a number of conditions and items studied these methods demonstrated comparable power and Type 1 error rates. Differences between methods were observed in conditions with non-uniform DIF, where the LR test demonstrated more power to detect non-uniform DIF of small magnitudes. Sample size, focal group ability distribution, proportion of test-wide DIF, and direction of DIF had minimal effect on DIF detection across methods.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Occupational psychology;
Psychological tests
Classification
0624: Occupational psychology
0632: Psychological tests
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Differential item functioning; Item bias; Item response; Item response theory; Measurement equivalence; Statistical measurement; Test bias
Title
The evaluation of new criteria for polytomous DIF in the DFIT framework
Author
Fortmann-Johnson, Kristen A.
Number of pages
114
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0091
Source
DAI-B 69/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549516361
Advisor
Morris, Scott B.
University/institution
Illinois Institute of Technology
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3305332
ProQuest document ID
304860262
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304860262/abstract
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