Abstract/Details

Non-parametric early-warning systems for major infectious diseases in Mali


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

The countries with the largest infectious diseases burden tend to also be the least resourceful. Consequently, public health authorities in those countries need adequate predictive approaches, i.e. early warning-systems, to reduce the burden of infectious diseases whilst minimizing excessive budgetary costs. However, the analytical, parametric treatment and prediction models for even the simplest infectious disease transmission system are often too complex to be widely useful because of. Furthermore, the operation and optimization of early-warning systems frequently require a level of expertise unusually found in the poorest and most burdened countries. Therefore, this dissertation entertains different approaches to infectious diseases prediction and early-warning systems. Here, non-parametric early-warning methods from econometrics and engineering are co-opted and put in the service of public health.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Applied Mathematics;
Public health;
Epidemiology;
Infectious diseases
Classification
0364: Applied Mathematics
0573: Public health
0766: Epidemiology
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Applied sciences; Acute respiratory infections; Diarrhea; Early warning systems; Infectious diseases; Malaria
Title
Non-parametric early-warning systems for major infectious diseases in Mali
Author
Medina, Daniel C.
Number of pages
212
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0054
Source
DAI-B 71/02, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109606478
Advisor
Findley, Sally E.
University/institution
Columbia University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3393471
ProQuest document ID
304865962
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304865962
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