Abstract/Details

The preservation of emittance and polarization in the International Linear Collider


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

High luminosity in the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a very small vertical normalized emittance of 40 nm. The emittance on Damping Ring extraction is 20 nm giving an emittance budget of 20 nm for all components between the Damping Ring (DR) and the Interaction Point (IP). This tight budget requires sophisticated emittance preservation schemes to mitigate growth due to dispersive and chromatic effects, wakefields, coupling and stray fields. The principle sources of emittance growth are first introduced and then the Beam-Based Alignment techniques used in the ILC to mitigate emittance growth are investigated.

Polarized positron and electron beams are ideal for searching for new physics at the ILC. In order to properly orient and preserve the polarization of both beams at the IP, beam polarization must be manipulated by a series of spin rotators along the beam line. Furthermore, the ILC design requires that the polarization for both beams be known with a relative uncertainty of 0.5% or better, therefore, it is essential that all sources of depolarization along the ILC be identified. A spin rotator design for the ILC is proposed in this dissertation and then polarization studies between Damping Ring extraction and the Interaction Point are investigated.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Physics;
Particle physics
Classification
0753: Physics
0798: Particle physics
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences; Emittance; Polarization; Spin rotator
Title
The preservation of emittance and polarization in the International Linear Collider
Author
Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne
Number of pages
291
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0058
Source
DAI-B 68/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Rubin, David
University/institution
Cornell University
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3260825
ProQuest document ID
304867233
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304867233
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