Abstract/Details

U.S. aid: Helping others or helping themselves?


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

The allocation of US foreign aid can be motivated by altruism, self-interest, or both. These motivations can be different for military assistance or economic aid and can change significantly over time. Thus, it is important to analyze US aid allocations not only in terms of the different types of aid but also within different time periods. This paper examines the determinants of the allocation of US aid commitments over the period 1992-2006. By disaggregating the aid data into economic and military aid, it is found that economic aid is influenced by both strategic and humanitarian motivations, but military aid is only directed by strategic interest. By using five-year sub-samples, I confirm previous findings that strategic interests are particularly salient since September 11th, 2001, and humanitarian motivations have somewhat diminished during the same time period.

Indexing (details)


Subject
International law;
Public administration
Classification
0616: International law
0617: Public administration
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Aid allocation; Aid motivations; Economic aid; Foreign assistance; Foreign policy; Military aid
Title
U.S. aid: Helping others or helping themselves?
Author
Grover, Jacob
Number of pages
60
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0076
Source
MAI 47/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109083989
Advisor
Dillon, Andrew
University/institution
Georgetown University
Department
Public Policy & Policy Management
University location
United States -- District of Columbia
Degree
M.P.P.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1462545
ProQuest document ID
304886883
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304886883
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