Abstract/Details

Unsettled sleep: The construction and consequences of a public health media campaign


2007 2007

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Abstract (summary)

Public health media campaigns involve more than simply transmitting information to its audience: they advocate deep social change that involves the embodiment of specific values, lifestyles, and behaviors. Social factors are involved in what issue becomes a public health media campaign and how the messages are created and communicated. Once presented, there are implications and expectations for how these messages are to be received. There are also consequences of public health media campaigns that may cause harm as well as good. This dissertation examines what is underlying the creation, implementation and dissemination of a public health campaign. The Back to Sleep campaign to reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is used as a case study. A multi dimensional methodology of interviews, participant observation, and content analysis diagnoses the underlying factors that go into constructing a national public health media campaign, as well as the campaign’s intended and unintended consequences.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Public health;
Families & family life;
Personal relationships;
Sociology;
Mass media;
Studies
Classification
0573: Public health
0628: Families & family life
0628: Personal relationships
0628: Sociology
0708: Mass media
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Back to Sleep; Media campaign; Public health; SIDS; Sudden infant death syndrome
Title
Unsettled sleep: The construction and consequences of a public health media campaign
Author
Hackett, Martine
Number of pages
225
Publication year
2007
Degree date
2007
School code
0046
Source
DAI-A 68/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780549258766
Advisor
Rothman, Barbara Katz
University/institution
City University of New York
Department
Sociology
University location
United States -- New York
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3283137
ProQuest document ID
304888608
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304888608
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