Abstract/Details

The “Sacred Feminine” in the age of the blockbuster


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

This dissertation project examines the concept of the "Sacred Feminine" and its mobilization in current popular culture, both as a phenomenon and as a problem to be addressed by 21st-century feminists. First, I trace the development of the concept in the work of second-wave feminist theologians of the 1970's and 1980's, who adapted the concept from the work of comparative mythologists such as James Frazer and Robert Graves. Then I examine how the concept is used in Dan Brown's bestselling adventure novel, the controversial The Da Vinci Code, as well as how it reappears, transformed in various ways, in the myriad discourses generated by the novel. Finally, I turn to the work of Julia Kristeva, which is typified by a radically different approach to the concept of the "Sacred Feminine" than that of Anglo-American feminists and which also includes an adventure novel, Murder in Byzantium, which is itself a response to Dan Brown's novel.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Religion;
Rhetoric;
Gender studies
Classification
0318: Religion
0681: Rhetoric
0733: Gender studies
Identifier / keyword
Philosophy, religion and theology; Social sciences; Language, literature and linguistics; Brown, Dan; Frazer, James; Graves, Robert; Kristeva, Julia; Popular culture; Sacred feminine
Title
The “Sacred Feminine” in the age of the blockbuster
Author
Kearney, Vanessa Lynn
Number of pages
304
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0093
Source
DAI-A 70/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109182736
Advisor
Calloway-Thomas, Carolyn
Committee member
Hawkins, Joan; Kaplan, Michael; Kilgore, De Witt D.
University/institution
Indiana University
Department
Communication and Culture
University location
United States -- Indiana
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3358904
ProQuest document ID
304899340
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304899340
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