Abstract/Details

The booster network: A framework for analyzing state policy formation in an era of resurgent private power


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

The continuing shift toward privatization has created new opportunities for private participation in transportation policy formation, infrastructure development, and service provision. The resulting high stakes have drawn a variety of traditionally powerful private players to overtly participate in Texas state policy making. Understanding policy formation in this era of resurgent private power is imperative because the outcomes will affect urban development, population distribution, and subsequent politics and policy.

With this paper, I analyze Trans Texas Corridor policy formation using a new framework, the booster network. The framework is based in policy studies and urban development literatures, conceptualizes policy formation in five parts anchored to the legislative process, identifies players, and explains how they influence substantive policy outcomes. My methodology features an instrumental case study, designed to develop the framework, which includes a literature review and analyses of governmental documents and video of state legislative activity, supplemented by newspaper articles.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Urban planning;
Area planning & development;
Transportation;
Public administration
Classification
0999: Urban planning
0999: Area planning & development
0709: Transportation
0617: Public administration
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Texas
Title
The booster network: A framework for analyzing state policy formation in an era of resurgent private power
Author
Embry, Patrick McKellar
Number of pages
159
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
2502
Source
MAI 44/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542609954, 0542609959
Advisor
Li, Jianling
University/institution
The University of Texas at Arlington
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1433743
ProQuest document ID
304904052
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304904052
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