Abstract/Details

Effect of hiking poles on vertical axis ground reaction force during two heights of step-down walking in backpackers


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Descending, load carrying, and stepping down relatively large vertical displacements in a single step may simultaneously increase vertical ground reaction force when backpacking. Both high load amplitude and high loading rate have been associated with injury or disease risk. Measurement of countermeasure efficacy may assist participants to control adversity in a popular activity.

This study compared plantar pressure data of vertical ground reaction force (GRF) during backpack loaded descent through two different vertical displacements and measured the effect of steps-down taken with, and without hiking poles. All subjects carried a pack weighing 20% of their body weight.

Neither pole use, nor step-down height, exhibited an effect on time to peak force, although men were significantly faster than women. Step depth significantly affected peak force. Analysis with body mass as a covariant showed pole use significantly reduced peak force. Step depth significantly affected rate of force development.

These results suggest that, for burdened backpackers, taking large negative vertical displacements in stride without modifying their gait may provoke significant peak vertical GRF loads and significantly impulsive rates of lower limb loading. Unsophisticated use of hiking poles may attenuate peak force on deeper step depth without necessarily blunting the rate of force development.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Sports medicine;
Public health
Classification
0575: Sports medicine
0573: Public health
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences
Title
Effect of hiking poles on vertical axis ground reaction force during two heights of step-down walking in backpackers
Author
Fuller, Joseph
Number of pages
89
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
6060
Source
MAI 44/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
0542626500, 9780542626500
Advisor
Perell, Karen
University/institution
California State University, Fullerton
University location
United States -- California
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1433848
ProQuest document ID
304904992
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304904992
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