Abstract/Details

Habitat suitability models using autologistic regression for the rare Missouri bladder-pod (<i>Lesquerella filiformis</i>)


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Three descriptive habitat suitability models were built for the federally threatened Missouri bladder-pod (Lesquerella filiformis), using three years of data (1997, 1998, and 2003). The study site, Bloody Hill Glade, is located on federal land and contains a permanent sampling grid. Autologistic regression models were built with spatially explicit, ground-truthed data; presence/absence of L. filiformis is the dependent variable and cover categories of habitat attributes are independent variables. Each selected model included a different set of habitat variables most important to describing likelihood of L. filiformis presence. However, pebble-clad [PEBBLE] and forb [FORB] microhabitats, and canopy cover of the invasive Juniperus virginiana [CEDAR], were consistent among all three models. Each model accurately predicts presence of L. filiformis in the other years of data collection. These models provided microhabitat-scale results that can be used by plant conservationists and managers, and prompted management recommendations as well as suggestions for future research.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Biostatistics;
Ecology
Classification
0308: Biostatistics
0329: Ecology
Identifier / keyword
Biological sciences
Title
Habitat suitability models using autologistic regression for the rare Missouri bladder-pod (<i>Lesquerella filiformis</i>)
Author
Edwards, Dawn B.
Number of pages
58
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
1281
Source
MAI 45/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542862588
Advisor
Kelrick, Michael
University/institution
Truman State University
University location
United States -- Missouri
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1437747
ProQuest document ID
304911761
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304911761
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