Abstract/Details

Understanding O'Neill's local legacy: Factors influencing the relationship between literary sites and local communities


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site in Danville, California lacks local stakeholders and struggles to maintain relevance in the community. The purpose of this qualitative study was two fold: to examine the perceptions of community relations with other U.S. literary sites elicited through phone interviews to determine which potential factors may influence those relations; and to explore the meanings, significance, and degree of place attachment the Danville community ascribes to the O'Neill historic site by conducting focus groups. Specific factors that emerged from the data reveal potential positive and negative effects on the community relations based on the perceptions of the community, the literary sites, and the writers. The O'Neill historic site has a low level of positive factors, indicating a lack of significant place attachment among the community. Identifying these factors and their influences will assist the management in developing effective community outreach efforts and build a stronger relationship.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Marketing;
Management;
Public administration;
Museums
Classification
0338: Marketing
0454: Management
0617: Public administration
0730: Museums
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Eugene O'Neill
Title
Understanding O'Neill's local legacy: Factors influencing the relationship between literary sites and local communities
Author
Styles, Margaret E.
Number of pages
165
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
6340
Source
MAI 44/06M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542749230
Advisor
Coble, Theresa
University/institution
Stephen F. Austin State University
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1436121
ProQuest document ID
304912851
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304912851
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