Abstract/Details

Narrowing the achievement gap between economically disadvantaged students and their advantaged peers: A Pennsylvania schools study


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

This study surveyed a group of Pennsylvania schools to examine how they have succeeded at narrowing the test performance achievement gap between economically disadvantaged students and their more advantaged peers. The schools were chosen from a school analysis completed by Standard & Poor's (SchoolMatters, 2006). On-line surveys were sent via email to all 45 school principals in the analysis. 25 of the 45 principals responded to the survey.

The study sought to identify common characteristics of each school that directly relate to the seven Effective School Correlates (ESCs) identified by Lezotte (2008). The goal was to identify common strategies used by these 45 schools to decrease the test performance achievement gap between economically disadvantaged students and the average of their peers, and determine whether these common strategies appeared to operationalize the Effective School Correlates identified by Lezotte (2008).

Indexing (details)


Subject
School administration
Classification
0514: School administration
Identifier / keyword
Education; Achievement gap; Economically disadvantaged; Pennsylvania
Title
Narrowing the achievement gap between economically disadvantaged students and their advantaged peers: A Pennsylvania schools study
Author
Hallock, William S., Jr.
Number of pages
65
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0099
Source
DAI-A 70/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109238167
Advisor
Mahlios, Marc
Committee member
Crawford, George; Friedman-Nimz, Reva; McKnight, Phil; Perkins, Perry
University/institution
University of Kansas
Department
Educational Leadership and Policy Studies
University location
United States -- Kansas
Degree
Ed.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3360107
ProQuest document ID
304917869
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304917869
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