Abstract/Details

Past the summit: Metaphors and environmental ethics in mountaineering narratives


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Mountaineering narratives, non-fiction accounts of climbing expeditions, are ripe for ecocritical study. Climbing narratives address human action in the wilderness, often ending in heroic success or miserable tragedy. It is only natural to ask the question, how do mountaineering texts envision the environment? In mountaineering narratives, metaphors reveal attitudes towards the environment. Many metaphors visualize the mountains as objectives, enemies, and arenas for human competition. However, recent mountaineering texts offer a wider range of metaphors, some of which construct more sustainable environmental ethics. These sustainable metaphors of goddess and spirit encourage participation in an interconnected relationship between earth and humanity. This interconnectedness in turn creates a more humane society. So, by understanding the inherent assumptions in language, we can choose to resist metaphors that allow us to harm the world and instead choose metaphors that will help us keep the entire biotic community beautiful and stable.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Literature;
Comparative literature
Classification
0298: Literature
0295: Comparative literature
Identifier / keyword
Language, literature and linguistics
Title
Past the summit: Metaphors and environmental ethics in mountaineering narratives
Author
Ericson, Katherine M.
Number of pages
131
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0922
Source
MAI 45/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542884122
Advisor
Widdicombe, Toby
University/institution
University of Alaska Anchorage
University location
United States -- Alaska
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1438031
ProQuest document ID
304918474
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304918474
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