Abstract/Details

Part A: Nanoscale semiconductors through electrodeposition. Part B: Mechanistic studies of the copper-catalyzed reactions


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

This research aims to optimize the synthesis of oriented inorganic semiconductor nanostructures through templated electrodeposition. Specifically, the thesis focused on cadmium selenide and cadmium telluride. The electrodepostion conditions were first optimized using nickel, gold or indium tin oxide as the electrode. These conditions were then used to deposit within the pores of polycarbonate or anodic aluminum oxide membranes to yield nanorods or nanotubes. The nanostructure synthesis was further extended to segmented nanorod or coaxial nanorod structures by addition an extra deposition cycle. The realization of these structures through electrodeposition adds a valuable tool in the synthetic tool box for the synthesis of semiconductor nanostructures for solar cells.

In the other part of my research, the mechanism of copper-catalyzed cross coupling reactions was probed through chemical kinetics. The results obtained were not consistent with the normally proposed mechanistic path - oxidative elimination.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Inorganic chemistry
Classification
0488: Inorganic chemistry
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences, Cadmiun selenide, Copper, Electrodeposition, Mechanism, Nanorods, Nanotubes, Semiconductors
Title
Part A: Nanoscale semiconductors through electrodeposition. Part B: Mechanistic studies of the copper-catalyzed reactions
Author
Chevere-Trinidad, Nestor Luis
Number of pages
179
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 70/03, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109059243
Advisor
Venkataraman, Dhandapani
Committee member
Coughlin, E. Bryan; Lahti, Paul M.; Vachet, Richard W.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Chemistry
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3349714
ProQuest document ID
304920668
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304920668
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