Abstract/Details

Directed assembly: Host-guest chemistry, nanowires, and polymeric templates


2009 2009

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Directed assembly provides a method to generate nanoscale materials with intrinsic electronic, optical, and magnetic properties. The approach combines self-assembly (bottom-up approaches) with current top down techniques to create nanoscale materials. Noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, electrostatics, and π-stacking, can be used spatially to guide molecules into supramolecular or nanoscale complexes.

This thesis demonstrates new nanofabrication methods, starting with relatively simple interactions, such as host-guest chemistry, and proceeding to more complex nanoscale materials. Chapter 1 provides a general overview of the motivation behind nanofabrication techniques. Chapter 2 provides a fundamental understanding of noncovalent interactions and their use within bottom-up approaches. Chapter 3 cites specific host-guest chemistry of an azobenzene flavin moiety that tunes the optical properties of the push-pull system. Chapter 4 provides a method to assemble organic nanowires through cooperative dipolar and hydrogen bonding interactions. And finally, Chapter 5 facilitates the combination of bottom-up and top down approaches by introducing nanoimprinted polymer patterns as self-assembly templates.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Organic chemistry
Classification
0490: Organic chemistry
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences; Directed assembly; Host-guest; Nanowires; Polymeric templates; Self-assembly
Title
Directed assembly: Host-guest chemistry, nanowires, and polymeric templates
Author
Jordan, Brian J.
Number of pages
128
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 70/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109228359
Advisor
Rotello, Vincent M.
Committee member
Barnes, Michael D.; Bhatia, Surita; Knapp, Michael J.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Chemistry
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3359899
ProQuest document ID
304921437
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304921437
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.