Abstract/Details

Persistently present: College students, social-mobile technologies, and the transformation of social life


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Persistently Present argues that we need to more fully reassess our thinking about the relationship(s) between social connectedness and technologically mediated forms of communication (particularly social-mobile technologies). Noting that contemporary social life is marked by connections that are more flexible, accessible, negotiable, and persistent because communication opportunities are nearly constant, I argue that social-mobile technologies are shifting and reconfiguring the ways that students build and maintain their social relationships. Within this environment social-mobile technologies are effectively serving as tools of social extensibility , allowing individuals to expand, enhance, and extend their social presence. As a result, these technologies are altering the when, where, and how (contexts) of contemporary connectedness and interactions. The concept of social extensibility is investigated across four important and interdependent areas that emerged in my data and the related literature: connectivity, virtual spaces, non-spaces, and expressiveness.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social structure;
Mass communications;
Higher education
Classification
0700: Social structure
0708: Mass communications
0745: Higher education
Identifier / keyword
Communication and the arts; Social sciences; Education; College students; Communication; Presence; Social extensibility; Social life; Social-mobile technologies
Title
Persistently present: College students, social-mobile technologies, and the transformation of social life
Author
Gammon, Mark A.
Number of pages
290
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 70/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109228328
Advisor
Irvine, Janice M.
Committee member
Alvarez, Rosio; Tomaskovic-Devey, Donald
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Sociology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3359896
ProQuest document ID
304922594
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304922594
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