Abstract/Details

Relationship between pediatric lead poisoning and executive system functioning


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Lead poisoning at sufficient dose is known to effect general cognitive functioning (Needleman, 2004). Well designed studies of children with clinical lead exposure have identified vulnerabilities in terms of attention, organization, and other features of executive function (Bellinger, 2004 & Canfield, 2004). This study examined executive functioning deficits of twenty four lead exposed children who evaluated on a general battery at ages seven to eleven years old. Serum lead levels were available from medical records and ranged from 11 ug/dL to 114 ug/dL. Archival data was reviewed which included full cognitive batteries, family and social history, behavior checklists, and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure was used to assess executive functioning. A regression model analysis equation including the chronological age of exposure, duration of exposure, and dose of exposure was the ROCF score was performed. Peak dose of exposure and first age of exposure were found to be significant determinants of executive system functioning. Duration of exposure was not found to be a significant variable.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychotherapy
Classification
0622: Psychotherapy
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Executive function; Lead poisoning; Pediatric; Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test
Title
Relationship between pediatric lead poisoning and executive system functioning
Author
Gentile, Jennifer K.
Number of pages
114
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
1005
Source
DAI-B 67/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542695117
Advisor
Berman, Stanley
University/institution
Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Psy.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3217489
ProQuest document ID
304923854
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304923854
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