Abstract/Details

Relative influence of descriptive and injunctive norms on behavioral intentions


2009 2009

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Two studies investigated the moderating effects of a series of variables on the relation between subjective norms and behavioral intentions. Study 1 probed the moderating effects of real vs. hypothetical construal of behavioral engagement on the relation between subjective norms and intentions to donate money. Contrary to hypotheses, expectations of real behavioral engagement attenuated the relation between subjective norms and behavioral intentions. In support of hypotheses, descriptive norms proved to be a more accessible source of normative information. Study 2 probed the moderating effects of experience with the target behavior and framing of the behavior for binge drinking. While there was no effect of experience with the target behavior on the descriptive norm-intention relation, experience served to attenuate the injunctive norm-intention relation. There was no effect framing of the behavior on the relation between subjective norms and behavioral intentions. While increases in social desirability lead to stronger relations between subjective norms and behavioral intentions for donating money, there were no moderating effects of social desirability on the relations when it came to drinking behaviors. There were also no moderating effects of need for cognition on the relations for either behavior.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology
Classification
0451: Social psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology, Behavioral intentions, Descriptive norm, Injunctive norm, Normative perception, Subjective norm
Title
Relative influence of descriptive and injunctive norms on behavioral intentions
Author
Manning, Mark
Number of pages
117
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 70/09, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109352092
Advisor
Ajzen, Icek
Committee member
Anderson, Daniel; Keller, Lisa; Tropp, Linda
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3372267
ProQuest document ID
304927541
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304927541
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.