Abstract/Details

Africa University's approach to Zimbabwe's HIV/AIDS epidemic: A case study of teacher preparation


2009 2009

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

This study investigated the causes of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zimbabwe as perceived by students and faculty at Africa University, a pan African international private institution situated in Mutare, the third-largest city in Zimbabwe. The main purpose of the study was three-fold; (1) to investigate the perceived causes of the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe, the worst affected country in Southern Africa; (2) to examine the role of teacher preparation programs in dealing with the HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe; and (3) to explore the role of sex education in combating the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zimbabwe.

A phenomenological theoretical framework provided the scope and dimension of a qualitative research approach formulated to collect data on the perceived causes of the HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe among students and faculty at Africa University. The case study design chosen used detailed semi-structured interviews, observations and documentary evidence and employed questioning strategies of a “how” and “why” nature. It did not require control over behavioral events and is a commonly used approach among studies focusing on present-day events in their real-life context.

The case study design was chosen as a particularly good means of educational investigation because of its ability to explain the causal links in real-life interventions that are too complex for survey or experimental strategies. I observed a total of eight two-hour lessons in a range of classes made up of senior students preparing to be either high school teachers or health educators. All the classes that I observed were large and ranged from forty students to one hundred. In none of the classes that I observed were there HIV/AIDS materials displayed in the classrooms or lecture halls. However, well-illustrated billboards about HIV/AIDS were erected on all the entrances to the university campus. I interviewed eight senior students and eight faculty members. Initial data analysis took place through analyzing responses on observation notes that I compiled in the eight lessons that I observed. Different colors of markings were used to identify common themes. The themes that emerged from the observations were basically similar to those that came from the analysis of the semi-structured interviews.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Teacher education;
Public health;
Health education;
Colleges & universities;
Human immunodeficiency virus--HIV;
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome--AIDS;
Epidemics;
Case studies
Classification
0530: Teacher education
0573: Public health
0680: Health education
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Education; AIDS; Africa University; Epidemic; HIV/AIDS; HIV/AIDS epidemic; Life expectancy; Perceived causes; Phenomenological; Sex education; Southern Africa; Teacher preparation; Transformative leadership; Zimbabwe
Title
Africa University's approach to Zimbabwe's HIV/AIDS epidemic: A case study of teacher preparation
Author
Rumano, Moses B.
Number of pages
158
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0126
Source
DAI-A 70/04, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109094855
Advisor
Fowler, Frances
University/institution
Miami University
University location
United States -- Ohio
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3353564
ProQuest document ID
304932783
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304932783
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.