Abstract/Details

Social norms and academic dishonesty


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

This article aims to evaluate the salience of the perception of the beliefs and behavior of peers as a predictor of students' own beliefs and behaviors regarding academic dishonesty. Particular attention is paid to discerning the relative predictive power of different peers or peer groups (e.g. the average student, your best friend, etc.). Specifically this study offers support for the following conclusions (especially in regards to academic dishonesty): students over-perceive their peers' delinquency; these misperceptions increase as social distance increases; there is a positive correlation between one's perception of his peers' delinquent behavior and one's own; and the strength of this correlation generally lessens as the social distance of the peer group being referenced increases.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Educational sociology;
Social psychology;
Educational psychology;
Sociology
Classification
0340: Educational sociology
0451: Social psychology
0525: Educational psychology
0626: Sociology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Education; Psychology
Title
Social norms and academic dishonesty
Author
Beasley, Eric
Number of pages
29
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0128
Source
MAI 48/04M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109631777
Advisor
Conner, Tom
University/institution
Michigan State University
University location
United States -- Michigan
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1478816
ProQuest document ID
304948656
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304948656
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