Abstract/Details

Relationship of the mandibular canal and fixation placement to sensory alteration following orthognathic surgery


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Altered sensation is one common sequelae of orthognathic surgery involving the mandible. This pilot study was designed to assess the association of morphological and surgical factors related to mandibular canal location and post-surgical neurosensory alteration over 2 years as quantified by contact detection in patients having a BSSO. On both the right and left sides the average minimum distance from the lingual cortical plate to the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) was less than the distance from the IAC to the buccal cortical plate. The average distance from the surgical fixation screws to the IAC was approximately 1mm less on the left side. There were no consistent statistically significant correlations between the anatomical or surgical measured distances and the impairment in contact detection following orthognathic surgery. This methodology will allow for future in depth analysis of anatomical relationships and surgery related factors and their effects on sensory alterations following orthognathic surgery.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Medicine;
Dentistry;
Medical imaging
Classification
0564: Medicine
0567: Dentistry
0574: Medical imaging
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Cone beam CT; Mandibular surgery; Sensory alterations
Title
Relationship of the mandibular canal and fixation placement to sensory alteration following orthognathic surgery
Author
Tucker, Gary R., Jr.
Number of pages
36
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0153
Source
MAI 47/05M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109112672
Advisor
Phillips, Ceib
Committee member
Blakey, George; Cevidanes, Lucia
University/institution
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department
Orthodontics
University location
United States -- North Carolina
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1463799
ProQuest document ID
304959236
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304959236
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