Abstract/Details

The functions and initial reinforcement of non-suicidal self-injury: A startle modulation examination


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a pernicious and increasingly prevalent behavior, why people start and continue to engage in NSSI still is poorly understood. To elucidate these issues, the present study utilized a sample of 73 undergraduates (33 control; 24 affect dysregulation; 16 NSSI) and employed psychophysiological measures of affect (startle-alone reactivity) and quality of information processing (prepulse inhibition), and experimental methods involving a NSSI-proxy to mimic the NSSI process. Consistent with theory, it was predicted that the NSSI group would display cognitive-affective regulation after the NSSI-proxies whereas the control group would display dysregulation after the NSSI-proxy. Additionally, consistent with theory about initial reinforcement of NSSI, it was predicted that the affect dysregulation group would display dysregulation to the first, but regulation to the second NSSI-proxy. Results supported hypotheses, providing the best evidence yet for why people start and continue to engage in NSSI.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Psychobiology;
Clinical psychology;
Experimental psychology
Classification
0349: Psychobiology
0622: Clinical psychology
0623: Experimental psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Affect dysregulation; Cold pressor task; Non-suicidal self-injury; Pain; Prepulse inhibition; Startle
Title
The functions and initial reinforcement of non-suicidal self-injury: A startle modulation examination
Author
Franklin, Joseph C.
Number of pages
55
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0153
Source
MAI 48/03M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109539431
Advisor
Prinstein, Mitchell J.
Committee member
Abramowitz, Jonathan S.; Dichter, Gabriel S.
University/institution
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Department
Psychology
University location
United States -- North Carolina
Degree
M.A.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1472838
ProQuest document ID
304962420
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304962420
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