Abstract/Details

Testosterone and status seeking


2006 2006

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Abstract (summary)

Testosterone has recently been characterized as a personality variable, signifying individual differences in dominance strivings. This dissertation addresses the role testosterone plays in the environments people select. It was hypothesized that individuals high in testosterone would seek out high status positions, whereas individuals low in testosterone would be more comfortable in low status positions. This hypothesis was not confirmed. Instead, it was discovered that testosterone only exerts an effect on behavior in challenging or contentious settings. Furthermore, self-reported measures of dominance striving mediated the effects of testosterone. Specifically, when self-reported and physiological dominance were aligned, testosterone predicted behavior in a contentious setting whereas self-reported dominance predicted behavior in an agreeable setting. Individuals high in both testosterone and self-reported dominance were the only ones to rise to the challenge of contentious leadership. When self-reported and physiological dominance were in conflict, however, some participants demonstrated evidence of distress after denying a leadership opportunity, namely those individuals high in testosterone but low in self-reported dominance. The findings presented reveal evidence of the multifaceted nature of personality.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Social psychology;
Personality;
Physiological psychology
Classification
0451: Social psychology
0625: Personality
0989: Physiological psychology
Identifier / keyword
Psychology; Contention; Status-seeking; Testosterone
Title
Testosterone and status seeking
Author
Sellers, Jennifer Guinn
Number of pages
66
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0227
Source
DAI-B 67/12, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
Advisor
Josephs, Robert Alan
University/institution
The University of Texas at Austin
University location
United States -- Texas
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3245330
ProQuest document ID
304977581
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304977581
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