Abstract/Details

The economics of apologies: Theory, experiment, and application


2006 2006

Other formats: Order a copy

Abstract (summary)

Apologies are a previously understudied social institution integral in the maintenance of social relationships. Their application ranges from corporate culture to political systems to legal settings. This paper formulates a game theoretic signaling model using rational agents with two-dimensional type that is general enough to encompass a broad class of games where apologies can be used. I characterize the equilibrium and establish an existence result that extends single-crossing. The theory is then tested using a novel variant of the trust game experiment confirming all predictions. I use these findings to assess the use of apologies in medical malpractice litigation and estimate that state legislation that exempts apologies from being entered as evidence in court reduces the number of medical malpractice cases by 43%.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Economics;
Law
Classification
0501: Economics
0398: Law
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences; Apologies; Game theory; Medical malpractice; Signaling; Trust game
Title
The economics of apologies: Theory, experiment, and application
Author
Ho, Benjamin
Number of pages
101
Publication year
2006
Degree date
2006
School code
0212
Source
DAI-A 67/05, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542706899
Advisor
Lazear, Edward
University/institution
Stanford University
University location
United States -- California
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3219288
ProQuest document ID
304979101
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304979101
Access the complete full text

You can get the full text of this document if it is part of your institution's ProQuest subscription.

Try one of the following:

  • Connect to ProQuest through your library network and search for the document from there.
  • Request the document from your library.
  • Go to the ProQuest login page and enter a ProQuest or My Research username / password.