Abstract/Details

Vehicular ammonia emissions in Baltimore, Maryland


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Atmospheric ammonia is a precursor to the formation of fine particulate matter, which contributes to human health problems and decreased visibility. Atmospheric ammonia may also be transported through wet and dry deposition to water bodies such as the Chesapeake Bay, contributing to excess nutrient loadings that cause eutrophication. Vehicle exhaust contains ammonia, created by a reaction of NOx with H2 in the three-way catalytic converter. Ammonia emissions were measured using a mass balance on the Fort McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, Maryland. Atmospheric concentrations of gas-phase and particulate-phase ammonium were measured during 2003–2004 using denuders and filter packs. The average vehicle (veh) emission rate for these studies was 8.1 ± 4.3 mg NH3-N veh−1 km−1. We estimate the annual emission of ammonia from vehicles to be 151 metric tons NH3-N yr−1 in Baltimore City and County and 707 metric tons NH3-N yr−1 in all of Maryland.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Environmental science;
Automotive materials
Classification
0768: Environmental science
0540: Automotive materials
Identifier / keyword
Health and environmental sciences; Applied sciences
Title
Vehicular ammonia emissions in Baltimore, Maryland
Author
Erwin, Amy Corner
Number of pages
102
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0117
Source
MAI 44/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542257841, 054225784X
Advisor
Siefert, Ronald L.
University/institution
University of Maryland, College Park
University location
United States -- Maryland
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1428425
ProQuest document ID
304993217
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304993217
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