Abstract/Details

Materials assembly using molecular recognition and redox -modulated recognition


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The integration of non-covalent interactions in materials provides a direct mechanism to customize materials properties to specific applications and create novel nanostructures. Combining self-assembly with non-covalent interactions serves as a powerful tool in the creation of complex macromolecular structures with thermodynamically reversible contacts. With a host of non-covalent interactions available (e.g. dative bonding, hydrogen bonding, electrostatic pairings, π-stacking), tailoring the size and stability of self-assembled materials can be achieved through choice of interaction. This thesis describes two distinctive areas of research employing a rational combination of self-assembly and non-covalent interactions: (1) the synthesis and self-assembly of recognition unit functionalized Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) units and (2) the study of redox-modulated, molecular recognition in macromolecular systems.

POSS units have long been employed as covalent additives in both polymeric and ceramic-based systems. Now, they have found alternative uses as non-covalent modifiers in multiple supramolecular systems. POSS units inherently feature a variety of attributes, which make them attractive as molecular recognition elements. These three-dimensional, nanoscale "building blocks" (∼0.6 nm inner silicate core) can easily be functionalized with a variety of recognition units. Through synthetic modification we were able to create a versatile component for non-covalent self-assembly with defined spacial orientations. To that end, recognition unit functionalized POSS units have been shown to serve as potent non-covalent modifiers for applications including surface modification, nanoparticle self-assembly, thermal enhancement in polymeric systems, and potential cellular delivery systems.

Modulating non-covalent interactions via the reduction or oxidation of a molecule serves as an effective means in tuning the formation of supramolecular assemblies. Initial solution-based studies of both non-specific (urea-quinone) and specific, three-point (flavin-diamidopyridine) hydrogen bonding systems have been successful in understanding the complex behaviors, which govern redox-modulated molecular recognition. This understanding led to the incorporation of electrochemically tunable "host-guest" interactions on polymers and surfaces. Several interesting behaviors ranging from reversible redox-modulated recognition to induced proton transfer processes were observed and the ongoing focus of this research seeks to combine materials applications and redox-modulated recognition to create responsive, electrochemically tunable polymers and surfaces.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Organic chemistry;
Materials science
Classification
0490: Organic chemistry
0794: Materials science
Identifier / keyword
Applied sciences, Pure sciences, Flavin, Materials assembly, Molecular recognition, Redox-modulated recognition, Silsesquioxane
Title
Materials assembly using molecular recognition and redox -modulated recognition
Author
Carroll, Joseph B.
Number of pages
207
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 66/10, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
0542382601, 9780542382604
Advisor
Rotello, Vincent M.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3193888
ProQuest document ID
304994051
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304994051
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