Abstract/Details

Soluble polymer-supported catalysts and initiators


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

The development of polymer-supported chiral organic ligands for transition metal asymmetric catalysis is an area of research that is continuously receiving a lot of interest. This methodology addresses the major issue of recyclability and waste/product stream contamination in conventional homogeneous catalysis. The use of soluble polymers, as supports, couples the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and offers a means of recycling often expensive chiral ligands. The goal is to recycle the catalysts over multiple runs without loss of its activity. A novel semi-continuous technique for recycling soluble polymer-supported catalysts—“Soxhlet-Dialysis”—has been developed whereby the catalyst's activity and enantioselectivity is maintained over multiple runs. It was also observed that the spacer that linked the polymer to the catalyst had an unprecedented effect on the activity and enantioselectivity of the catalyst. Electronic effects on enantioselectivity of chiral Zn-salen catalysts were studied, and logical interpretation of the results provided the basis for a postulated catalytic mechanism. “Living” Free Radical Polymerization using a soluble polymer supported initiator was employed for the design of well-defined cleavable PS-b-PEG diblock copolymers for the fabrication of nanoporous thin films.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Organic chemistry;
Polymers
Classification
0490: Organic chemistry
0495: Polymers
Identifier / keyword
Pure sciences, Catalysts, Diblock copolymer, Polymer-supported, Soluble
Title
Soluble polymer-supported catalysts and initiators
Author
Anyanwu, Uche K.
Number of pages
130
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0118
Source
DAI-B 66/06, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542197383, 0542197383
Advisor
Venkataraman, D.
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3179852
ProQuest document ID
304997236
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304997236
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