Abstract/Details

A component analysis of interteaching in an undergraduate rehabilitation course


2009 2009

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Abstract (summary)

Traditional techniques and pedagogies of higher education institutions often fail to provide students with optimal arrangements for learning. Interteaching (Boyce & Hineline, 2002) introduces a beneficial way to arrange learning in the college class room and mitigates resistance towards earlier behavior analytic educational systems. A multielement design was used to alternate three conditions in an undergraduate research methods class: (a) lecture, (b) interteaching with points available for completion of preparation guides, and (c) interteaching with no points available for preparation guide completion. Results showed that interteaching conditions with or without points produced higher quiz scores as compared to lecture. However, approximately three times as many students turned in preparation guides when points were available for doing so. Interteaching conditions also lead to higher rates of student participation, and may be preferred by students.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Behavioral psychology;
Curriculum development;
Higher education
Classification
0384: Behavioral psychology
0727: Curriculum development
0745: Higher education
Identifier / keyword
Education; Psychology; College; Education; Instruction; Interteaching
Title
A component analysis of interteaching in an undergraduate rehabilitation course
Author
Filipiak, Stephen Nicholas
Number of pages
90
Publication year
2009
Degree date
2009
School code
0209
Source
MAI 48/01M, Masters Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9781109364705
Advisor
Rehfeldt, Ruth A.
Committee member
Cuvo, Anthony J.; Heal, Nicole A.
University/institution
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
Department
Behavior Analysis and Therapy
University location
United States -- Illinois
Degree
M.S.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
1469305
ProQuest document ID
304997462
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304997462
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