Abstract/Details

Engendering trauma: Gender, race, and family after child sexual abuse


2005 2005

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Abstract (summary)

Using extrafamilial child sexual abuse (CSA) as an example of family trauma, the author interviewed 62 parents of sexually abused boys on multiple occasions to analyze the organization of gender, race, and class in parental coping processes. Despite access to alternative interpretations of CSA that challenge conventional notions of gender, parents in this study typically relied on traditional themes to make meaning of the CSA experience. The author organized the data analytically around gender strategies and found that parents used race- and class-specific gender strategies in the aftermath of trauma. Most important, mother-blame is theorized as a form gender reaffirmation. The author uses the term gender reaffirmation to illustrate the way social actors recuperate after a situation has been interpreted as detrimental, challenging, or stressful to heteronormative gender relations. Mother-blaming accounts encouraged race and class enactments of gender that had negative consequences for women and helped secure men's cultural power.

Indexing (details)


Subject
Sociology;
Families & family life;
Personal relationships;
Social psychology
Classification
0626: Sociology
0628: Families & family life
0628: Personal relationships
0628: Sociology
0451: Social psychology
Identifier / keyword
Social sciences, Psychology, Child sexual abuse, Family, Gender, Masculinity, Race, Trauma
Title
Engendering trauma: Gender, race, and family after child sexual abuse
Author
McGuffey, Clifton Shawn
Number of pages
259
Publication year
2005
Degree date
2005
School code
0118
Source
DAI-A 66/11, Dissertation Abstracts International
Place of publication
Ann Arbor
Country of publication
United States
ISBN
9780542383427, 054238342X
Advisor
Zussman, Robert
University/institution
University of Massachusetts Amherst
University location
United States -- Massachusetts
Degree
Ph.D.
Source type
Dissertations & Theses
Language
English
Document type
Dissertation/Thesis
Dissertation/thesis number
3193924
ProQuest document ID
304997848
Copyright
Database copyright ProQuest LLC; ProQuest does not claim copyright in the individual underlying works.
Document URL
http://search.proquest.com/docview/304997848
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